Month: January 2017

Meet Fred

My sourdough starter. I had named him Stinky but I thought that so disrespectful so I renamed him Fred. Here is Fred in all his glory. Isn’t he lovely?

Fred and I have had a most unusual relationship during the last week. He usually just sits around doing absolutely nothing while I hand feed him every night. Typical, wouldn’t you say? Ah, to be Fred in the Peterson household!

It is that time of the year for me to get Fred going again – all in time for winter baking, I hope.  Making sourdough rolls, bread, even English Muffins is not difficult.  It sounds daunting, I know, but it’s not.  My mother used to make the most heavenly sour dough rolls for family holidays. I try to recreate them and am almost there (look for a future Sour Dough Dinner Roll recipe).

To be sure you have sour dough starter to make your baked goods this winter, follow the instructions below.  I’ll be making some items using the starter throughout the coming months.  Just remember, if you aren’t using your starter, store it in the refrigerator.  Feed once a week with equal parts water and flour and let sit out the night before you use it in a recipe.

Day 1: Make the Initial Starter

4 ounces (3/4 cup + 2 tablespoons) all-purpose flour
4 ounces (1/2 cup) water

Weigh the flour and water, and combine them in the container. Stir vigorously until combined into a smooth batter. It will look like a sticky, thick dough. Scrape down the sides and loosely cover the container with plastic wrap or the lid (left ajar).

Put the container somewhere with a consistent room temperature of 70°F to 75°F (like the top of the refrigerator) and let sit for 24 hours.

Day 2: Feed the Starter

4 ounces (3/4 cup + 2 tablespoons) all-purpose flour
4 ounces (1/2 cup) water

Take down your starter and give it a look. You may see a few small bubbles here and there. This is good! The bubbles mean that wild yeast have started making themselves at home in your starter. They will eat the sugars in the flour and release carbon dioxide (the bubbles) and alcohol. They will also increase the acidity of the mixture, which helps fend off any bad bacteria’s. At this point, the starter should smell fresh, mildly sweet, and yeasty.

If you don’t see any bubbles yet, don’t panic — depending on the conditions in your kitchen, the average room temperature, and other factors, your starter might just be slow to get going.

Weigh the flour and water for today, and combine them in the container. Stir vigorously until combined into a smooth batter. It will look like a sticky, thick dough. Scrape down the sides and loosely cover the container with plastic wrap or the lid (left ajar). Put the container somewhere with a consistent room temperature of 70°F to 75°F (like the top of the refrigerator) and let sit for 24 hours.

Day 3: Feed the Starter

4 ounces (3/4 cup + 2 tablespoons) all-purpose flour
4 ounces (1/2 cup) water

Check your starter. By now, the surface of your starter should look dotted with bubbles and your starter should look visibly larger in volume. If you stir the starter, it will still feel thick and batter-like, but you’ll hear bubbles popping. It should also start smelling a little sour and musty.

Again, if your starter doesn’t look quite like mine in the photo, don’t worry. Give it a few more days. My starter happened to be particularly vigorous!

Weigh the flour and water for today, and combine them in the container. Stir vigorously until combined into a smooth batter. It will look like a sticky, thick dough. Scrape down the sides and loosely cover the container with plastic wrap or the lid (left ajar). Put the container somewhere with a consistent room temperature of 70°F to 75°F (like the top of the refrigerator) and let sit for 24 hours.

Day 4: Feed the Starter

4 ounces (3/4 cup + 2 tablespoons) all-purpose flour
4 ounces (1/2 cup) water

Check your starter. By now, the starter should be looking very bubbly with large and small bubbles, and it will have doubled in volume. If you stir the starter, it will feel looser than yesterday and honeycombed with bubbles. It should also be smelling quite sour and pungent. You can taste a little too! It should taste sour and somewhat vinegary.

When I made my starter here, I didn’t notice much visual change from Day 3 to Day 4, but could tell things had progressed by the looseness of the starter and the sourness of the aroma.

Weigh the flour and water for today, and combine them in the container. Stir vigorously until combined into a smooth batter. It will look like a sticky, thick dough. Scrape down the sides and loosely cover the container with plastic wrap or the lid (left ajar). Put the container somewhere with a consistent room temperature of 70°F to 75°F (like the top of the refrigerator) and let sit for 24 hours.

Day 5: Starter is Ready to Use

Check your starter. It should have doubled in bulk since yesterday. By now, the starter should also be looking very bubbly — even frothy. If you stir the starter, it will feel looser than yesterday and be completely webbed with bubbles. It should also be smelling quite sour and pungent. You can taste a little too! It should taste even more sour and vinegary.

If everything is looking, smelling, and tasting good, you can consider your starter ripe and ready to use! If your starter is lagging behind a bit, continue on with the Day 5 and Beyond instructions.

Day 5 and Beyond: Maintaining Your Starter

4 ounces (3/4 cup + 2 tablespoons) all-purpose flour
4 ounces (1/2 cup) water

Once your starter is ripe (or even if it’s not quite ripe yet), you no longer need to bulk it up. To maintain the starter, discard (or use) about half of the starter and then “feed” it with new flour and water: weigh the flour and water, and combine them in the container with the starter. Stir vigorously until combined into a smooth batter.

If you’re using the starter within the next few days, leave it out on the counter and continue discarding half and “feeding” it daily. If it will be longer before you use your starter, cover it tightly and place it in the fridge. Remember to take it out and feed it at least once a week — I also usually let the starter sit out overnight to give the yeast time to recuperate before putting it back in the fridge.

How to Reduce the Amount of Starter:

Maybe you don’t need all the starter we’ve made here on an ongoing basis. That’s fine! Discard half the starter as usual, but feed it with half the amount of flour and water. Continue until you have whatever amount of starter works for your baking habits.

Sunday Brunch

Last Sunday I decided to make waffles, for some odd reason.  Call it a need for comfort food or perhaps I was bored with the usual breakfast of an egg, a piece of bacon and a piece of toast.  Whatever the reason, it was a great choice!

I just happened to have some waffle mix on hand, which I would not customarily have but bought it on a whim a few months back.  I saw the mix in my cupboard and decided that is what I would make for brunch (by that time, it WAS brunch).  I even had some whipped cream and a few frozen blueberries.  Alas, a wonderful waffle brunch was born.  You can’t beat that for planning, now can you?

I obviously made several waffles which are in the freezer for future Sunday brunches.  And why not?  It’ll be so nice to just take one out, heat it up, and slather with some maple syrup and fresh fruit and be done with it!

Sometimes it’s nice to cut those corners and just enjoy your meal!

Bon appétit!

It’s Soup Time!

Being a Florida girl, I have to admit I have little experience making soups but through my years of living in Atlanta, I am definitely learning. Growing up I remember Mom making Chili, of course, Beef Stew, White Bean soup (oh my, so delicious), and 4 Bean soup.  I think that was it or at least that’s all I remember. We just didn’t have that many cold days to warrant soup!  But she did manage to squeeze in a nice soup every now and then.

With all that being said, I absolutely love making soup and do it often during the colder months. This Broccoli and Cheddar soup is delicious. It thickens up quite a bit so doesn’t render itself well to left overs but you could always add a bit more chicken broth the next day to loosen it up a bit.

Although the picture above is this recipe using Mild Cheddar cheese, I prefer to use White Cheddar Cheese.  I’m just not a big of fan of “orange” cheese. If you use a White Cheddar Cheese, the soup would look like this. Now, isn’t that more appetizing?

Add a slice of crusty bread and you have a hearty, stick to your ribs, warm you up, meal!!

Bon appétit!

Broccoli Cheddar Soup
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Author:
Recipe type: Mains
Serves: 6 cups
Ingredients
  • 1 tablespoon butter, melted
  • ½ medium onion, chopped
  • ¼ cup butter, melted
  • ¼ cup flour
  • 2 cups half and half
  • 2 cups chicken broth
  • ½ lb. fresh broccoli (about 1 cup),finely chopped
  • 1 cup carrot, julienned
  • ¼ teaspoon nutmeg
  • 8 ounces white cheddar, grated
  • salt and pepper to taste
Instructions
  1. Saute the onion in 1 tablespoon melted butter and set aside. In a large pot, whisk together the melted butter and flour over medium heat for about 3-4 minutes.
  2. Slowly whisk in the half and half and chicken broth. Let it simmer for about 20 minutes.
  3. Add the broccoli, carrots, and onions. Let them simmer on medium low for about 25 minutes until the broccoli and carrots are tender.
  4. Add nutmeg, salt and pepper and cheddar cheese. Let the cheese melt and then serve. For a smooth soup, puree it using a stick blender. (I did not do this for mine as I prefer the chunks.)
Nutrition Information
Serving size: 1¼ cups Calories: 304 Fat: 23 g Saturated fat: 14.4 g Carbohydrates: 10.7 g Sugar: 5 g Sodium: 624 mg Fiber: 1.3 g Protein: 14.3 g Cholesterol: 70 mg

 

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